Do you eat artichokes?

artichokes and cherries at aix market
Farmer’s market in Aix-en-Provence

Artichokes are everywhere in the grocery store this time of year and they make a delicious treat for dinner.  I  grew up eating artichokes every once in a while. Back then we ate them with a side of butter sauce and a little extra salt.  I learned from a young age how to navigate my way around the “choke” which hides in the middle of the vegetable, lying in wait for an unsuspecting diner.

Artichokes in Paris

When I was a little older, I was once served an artichoke in Paris. I was there for a study abroad semester during my university days.  I’ll never forget how surprised my French host family was  when they saw that I knew how to eat an artichoke. They had apparently never met an American who had been raised in the ways of this wily vegetable.

Artie the Artichoke

Fighting artichoke
Artie the Fighting Artichoke.

I am also a fan of the Fighting Artichokes who hail from the Scottsdale Arizona Community College athletic department.  Despite having  no direct tie to that college, I love their mascot, Artie the Artichoke. I first learned about Artie  on a trip to Arizona a few years back.  According to several news blogs, Artie was selected by the students as the school’s mascot back in the 1970s.

Cooking and Eating Artichokes

Moving on to food and nutrition – here’s a bit about cooking and eating artichokes.  Artichokes are low in calories (about 90 calories for an entire large artichoke) and contain potassium and vitamin C along with a good amount of dietary fiber (over 8 g in a large artichoke).  Where the extra calories can sneak in, is in the sauce that is typically served alongside the artichoke for dipping.  I serve a simple balsamic vinaigrette as the dipping sauce; if you serve melted butter, hollandaise or mayonnaise instead, you will significantly add to the calories you gain from this dish.

Be sure to stop by the shop to stock up on supplies.

Hi, I am

Barbara Spalding MS, RDN, Culinary Dietitian

As a dietitian and world traveler, I love bold flavors — in food and in life. 14 years ago, I fell down the rabbit hole into Breast Cancer Wonderland. Since then, I’ve learned to cook differently while savoring the pleasures of food and companionship. I’ve built a resilient new life and a bold new kitchen. Let me show you the flavors of the world.
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Do you eat artichokes?
Do you eat artichokes
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
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Course Appetizers, Snacks
Cuisine French, Plant-based
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings
Course Appetizers, Snacks
Cuisine French, Plant-based
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings
Do you eat artichokes
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Recipe Notes

*If you are planning a more formal presentation of the artichokes, for example if you are serving them to guests, pull off the first layer of the tough outer leaves and/or cut the thorny tips off the leaves before cooking and brush with a little lemon juice to prevent discoloration. When I am serving artichokes at home, I usually don’t bother with this step.

Nutrition information per artichoke:  90 calories; 5 grams fat; 1 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat; 0 mg cholesterol;  102 mg sodium;  20 grams carbohydrate;  10 grams dietary fiber;  5 grams protein (values are approximate).