Edamame with Onion

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By Sue Sing Lim, MS, RDN, LDN

I recently stumbled upon delicious immature frozen soybeans at the supermarket and have loved them ever since. Originally from Japan, edamame themselves are very flavorful so you do not have to add too much spice or seasonings to make them taste good. Edamame are sold both shelled and unshelled. You can purchase them in the frozen section of your market; fresh edamame are hard to find in the US.  Don’t fret because frozen edamame are as delicious and as nutritious as the fresh ones. According to the USDA national nutrient database, 1 cup of edamame contains 676 mg of potassium, 8 grams of fiber, and 17 grams of protein! You can even eat edamame just as a snack!  Edamame should be boiled or steamed before eating. As a snack they will fill you up quickly and they have loads of nutrients. I invented this recipe as a simple vegetable dish for dinner using whatever I had in my pantry.

Edamame with Onion

(serves 2)

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of frozen edamame (shelled)*
  • ½ cup of diced yellow onion
  • 2 tbsp of diced garlic
  • 1 tbsp of soy sauce (low sodium soy sauce if watching your salt intake)
  • 1 tbsp of olive oil/canola oil

 

 

*Note: If the edamame is still in the shell, pre-boil the pods and remove the shells before using in this dish.

Preparation:

  1. Heat the oil in a pan on top of the stove.
  2. Add frozen edamame to get rid of any ice that remains on the beans from the freezer. Heat until all ice has melted and liquid has evaporated.
  3. Add onion and garlic and cook for 1-2 minutes or until desired texture is reached.
  4. Add soy sauce and continue to cook for another 30 seconds.
  5. Serve while hot.

 

There are many variations you can make for this dish.  For example, add the edamame to brown rice or noodles to make them a more complete meal. Or, pair edamame with another protein source such as shrimp or chicken. Try them today! Edamame can be found mostly in the frozen foods section of your local Asian market.  If you are unable to find them, ask someone at the market since they are a common ingredient that is normally kept in stock.

Approximate nutrition information per serving (with low sodium soy sauce):  170 calories;  10 grams fat; 0.5 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat;  0 mg cholesterol;  270 mg sodium;  14 grams carbohydrate;   4 grams dietary fiber;  8 grams protein.

 

 

Sue Sing Lim, MS, RDN, LDN is in charge of providing nutrition assessment and diet instruction for a hospital in Georgia.  She is an expert on Malaysian and Chinese cuisine.

 

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Barbara Spalding RDN Culinary Dietitian

Hi, I am

Barbara Spalding MS, RDN, Culinary Dietitian

As a dietitian and world traveler, I love bold flavors — in food and in life. 14 years ago, I fell down the rabbit hole into Breast Cancer Wonderland. Since then, I’ve learned to cook differently while savoring the pleasures of food and companionship. I’ve built a resilient new life and a bold new kitchen. Let me show you the flavors of the world.
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