UPDATE Motivate Yourself to Eat Right! (Part II)

Basket of VegetablesI hope you enjoyed the guest post written by Dr. Ellen Albertson, PhD, RDN, CD: how to motivate yourself to eat right. Dr. Ellen is the founder of SmashYourScale.com and the author of The Diabetic and The Dietitian: How to Help Your Husband Defeat Diabetes…Without Losing Your Mind or Marriage! In today’s post,  Dr. Ellen goes a little deeper into her discussion about motivation and provides three powerful secrets to help you get on track with eating a healthier diet.

Motivate Yourself to Eat Right – part two

by Dr. Ellen Albertson, PhD, RDN, CD

In my last post Motivate Yourself to Eat Right I revealed the surprising truth about motivation: While we tend to think the “carrot and stick” approach is better at influencing behavior, engaging in an activity because it’s fun, interesting, rewarding, challenging and makes us feel in control is much more powerful.

In my 20 years of practice, I’ve discovered three powerful, yet simple secrets to motivate yourself to eat right: Make healthy eating pleasurable, make it social and practice self-compassion.

Make Healthy Eating Pleasurable

It’s time to ditch your negative thoughts and beliefs around healthy eating. Forget that your mother made you finish your fish and vegetables before dessert. Erase your nasty experience with the Cabbage Soup Diet, yuck! Dislike vegetables? Try a new way of cooking/using them. My husband Michael hates vegetables. But he loves raw broccoli dipped in hummus for a snack. Get creative!

Eating healthy can be fun and flavorful! Just look at the recipes on Barbara’s website. I love her Poached Egg and Avocado on Toast and the Quinoa and Bean Chili is quick, simple and so good my fussy 14-year-old inhales it.

Healthy eating doesn’t have to be expensive. In fact, cooking nourishing meals at home will save money… and your health, which is priceless.

Hate to cook? Another false belief you need to dump down the disposal. Our social, media and economic systems encourage unhealthy eating and cooking illiteracy by portraying meal prep as a “burden” in an effort to get the majority of us to eat prepared, processed food, which are more profitable for manufacturers instead of cooking fresh meals with healthy, nutrient packed, fresh ingredients. If you let it, cooking can be fun, engaging and even a bit magical. After all, when cooking and eating, just like making love, you use all your senses —sight, hearing, touch, smell and taste.

If you can read this post, you can cook. Set an intention to improve your healthy cooking skills. Start with simple, easy recipes that interest you and enjoy yourself. As your skill level increases your anxiety around cooking will decrease, and you’ll boost mastery, autonomy and purpose. Soon, you’ll be throwing dinner parties and for your friends, which brings me to my next tip.

Get Social

Tell everyone you know—friends, lovers, neighbors, your hairdresser and your boss— about your healthy eating goal. Publicly commit… helps an intention stick! Tell people specifically how they can help you. For example, I had one client who couldn’t fill up his car without buying junk food at the Quickie Mart. I suggested he ask his wife to fill up the car for him. Chip addiction… crushed!

Post goals and intentions on your social sites. Consider joining an online group for additional support. There are thousands of groups related to healthy eating. Introduce yourself. State your goals. Connect. Make friends. Help and support others as they help you. These powerful doses of meaning and purpose will keep you motivated and on the highway to health transformation.

Self-compassion

Practicing self-compassion, essentially treating yourself like a good friend, will help you change your eating habits and life. Research shows self-compassion can help you engage in healthier behaviors including sticking to your weight-loss goals, exercising, quitting smoking and going to the doctor when needed.

With self-compassion you’ll start to eat right because you care about your body and yourself. Self-compassion will also help you regulate your emotions, so you’ll be less likely to stuff your feelings and comfort yourself by eating. And when you do slip up (you’re just human, after all), research shows self-compassion can help you accept your personal failure and get back on track. Plus, self-compassion increases optimism and wellbeing while lowering stress.

One of the key elements of self-compassion is self-kindness rather than self-criticism. While we all have a critical voice that tells us things like “I eat too much,” “I don’t exercise enough,” or “I should work harder” … this negative, inner voice is not a good motivator. Our critical voice doesn’t move us forward. It makes us feel bad about ourselves, especially when we fail to meet a goal. This internal criticism leaves us feeling bad, sad and depressed… which can send you right back into a negative down cycle, searching for solace, leading to emotional overeating. Don’t listen to that negative, inner voice! Remember, you are in control. The more you care about, listen to and accept your body the more motivated and better able you’ll be to stick with your healthy eating goals.

Time to ditch the excuses, evasions and media generated false hope of fast food, fat and salt saturated “instant” microwave meals and chemically “enhanced” processed pabulum. It’s a new day, with a new way. Have fun, involve others, and be kind to yourself.

Dr. Ellen Albertson, PhD, RDN, CD is a Psychologist, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Wellcoach. Dr. Ellen is the founder of SmashYourScale.com and the author of The Diabetic and The Dietitian: How to Help Your Husband Defeat Diabetes…Without Losing Your Mind or Marriage! 

If you enjoyed this post, please share it with your friends and family!

Motivate Yourself to Eat Right!

Motivate Yourself to Eat RightI’m very excited to offer you a wonderful guest post by Dr. Ellen Albertson, PhD, RDN, CD about how to motivate yourself to eat right. Dr. Ellen is the founder of SmashYourScale.com and the author of The Diabetic and The Dietitian: How to Help Your Husband Defeat Diabetes…Without Losing Your Mind or Marriage!

Motivate Yourself to Eat Right – part one

by Dr. Ellen Albertson, PhD, RDN, CD

Eating right is challenging. I know. I’m a food psychologist. I’ve heard every excuse imaginable: “I don’t buy produce because it spoils,” “Healthy food is expensive,” “I can’t stop snacking at night,” “My spouse is a junk food junkie,” “I have to keep chips in the house… for the kids.” Hmm, if you say so…

Motivation is the key to empowerment and eating right

In 20 years of practice, I’ve discovered the key to eating right and defeating the unhealthy obstacles in your path is increasing your motivation. Boosting your motivation will empower you to ditch the excuse mindset and develop healthy new habits.

Motivation — the desire to act in a purposeful manner to achieve specific desires — is what you need to succeed. From getting in shape and losing weight, to swapping the 500 calorie Mocha Frappuccino for a healthy green smoothie, motivation is the driving force needed to attain goals. Fortunately, while the amount of motivation we have varies by person and situation, research shows that you can influence and increase your level of motivation.

External motivation virus internal motivation

First it’s important to understand the two broad types of motivation: extrinsic (external) and intrinsic (internal). Extrinsic motivation comes from outside and refers to doing an activity to earn a reward or avoid punishment. It’s the “carrot and stick” mentality that we typically associate with motivation.

In contrast, intrinsic motivation comes from within. It’s driven by interest and enjoyment, performing an activity for its own sake rather than for some external outcome or reward. With intrinsic motivation, you’re not improving your diet because you have to, others are making you do it or you feel bad about yourself. You’re eating right because it’s important to you and you value being healthy.

Here’s the surprising truth about motivation. While we tend to think the “carrot and stick” approach is better at influencing behavior, engaging in an activity because it interests, challenges and actualizes you is a much more powerful motivator. Fearing punishment may motivate you to see a nutritionist after the doctor threatens, “Lower your cholesterol or else!” It may even compel you to purchase a gym membership or give up ice cream to look good on the beach. But alas, research clearly shows that being motivated by external factors doesn’t last for long.

Intrinsic motivation is long lasting

According to Daniel Pink, author of Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, the three elements that truly motivate us are autonomy, mastery and purpose. What will inspire you to forgo the fast food drive through and choose healthy eating consistently is the desire to direct your life (autonomy), the drive to get better and better at what matters to you (mastery) and the longing to be in service of something larger than yourself (purpose).

Focus on inner motivation and building autonomy, mastery and purpose and before you know it you’ll have forgotten your past struggles with food and will be able to stick with a healthy diet because it’s not a diet anymore… it’s how you, a healthy and happy person, want to eat. Eating right is no longer a goal… it’s who you are.

In part two of this series, I’ll provide three specific powerful, yet simple things you can do to increase your motivation to eat right.

Dr. Ellen Albertson, PhD, RDN, CD is a Psychologist, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Wellcoach. Dr. Ellen is the founder of SmashYourScale.com and the author of The Diabetic and The Dietitian: How to Help Your Husband Defeat Diabetes…Without Losing Your Mind or Marriage! 

Individual Cheesecakes for Dessert

Cheesecake is a favorite dessert for many people that is often served this time of year. It is traditionally made with full fat regular cream cheese, whole eggs, sugar and sometimes even heavy cream.  It is delicious – however, it is not very compatible with a healthy eating program, at least when it is made in the traditional manner. As a result, it should generally be reserved for special occasions and eaten in small amounts.

cheesecake Cheesecake is a favorite dessert for many people. It is traditionally made with full fat regular cream cheese, whole eggs, sugar and sometimes even heavy cream.  It is delicious. However, it is not very compatible with a healthy eating program, at least when made in the traditional manner. As a result, you should reserve it for special occasions and eat it in small amounts.

A Lighter Heathier Cheesecake

I’ve adapted this recipe in an effort to provide a somewhat lighter, somewhat healthier, version of this treat. I’ve substituted reduced fat cream cheese for the regular cream cheese. I also replaced one of the eggs with egg whites and used nonfat Greek yogurt instead of heavy cream.  I also used nonfat sweetened condensed milk which does add sweetness from the sugar but saves on the fat.  The crust is graham cracker crumbs and olive oil – the topping a simple raspberry compote made from frozen raspberries, a little sugar, water and some lemon juice.

Inspired by The Hotel Portillo in Chile

chile

The inspiration for this recipe came from the chef at the Hotel Portillo in Portillo, Chile who makes cheesecake with full fat cream cheese, regular condensed milk, sugar in the graham cracker crust and no yogurt.

A Great Dessert for a Weeknight or Get Together

Because I have adapted the ingredients in this recipe to create a somewhat healthier version of this cheesecake, this dish is a good option to serve once in a while as a weeknight dessert for your family after a home cooked meal.

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Happy Holidays! Individual Cheesecakes for Dessert
Individual Cheesecake
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Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 20-30 minutes
Passive Time 30 minutes
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cheesecakes
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Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 20-30 minutes
Passive Time 30 minutes
Servings
cheesecakes
Ingredients
Individual Cheesecake
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Recipe Notes

Approximate nutrition information per serving (without topping): 400 calories; 18 grams fat; 4.6 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat; 36 mg cholesterol; 310 mg sodium; 50 grams carbohydrate; 0.7 grams dietary fiber; 9 grams protein.

Veggie Burgers for the Grill

yam and black bean burgerDo you like the idea of a grilled burger, but are trying to cut back on your red meat consumption? This veggie burger is a healthy alternative to a traditional burger made from beef or turkey.  These burgers are easy to make and contain yams, portobello mushrooms, black beans and kale. You can make them up in advance and freeze them for the future.  This ensures you always have something that is quick, easy and healthy for dinner without making another trip to the store.

Veggie Burgers that are low in calories, high in fiber, and taste good

Compared to a regular hamburger, these are low in calories and high in fiber. Each burger (without the bun) provides approximately 110 calories, 5 grams of dietary fiber and 6 grams of protein.  By topping them up with a generous slice of tomato and some lettuce you can easily boost your veggie intake while adding another layer of flavor and color to the dish.

Serve with a side of Japanese-style cabbage slaw, and you have an easy and nutritious meal put together in no time at all.  To boost the protein, throw some almonds into the slaw which add 6 grams of protein per ounce (20-25 almonds).

Technique Tip: If you have never worked with parchment before, I recommend you try the pre-cut sheets, rather than the parchment that comes on a roll.  The pre-cut sheets are easier to use and are always ready to go. If you’d like to buy the pre-cut sheets from my shop, click here.

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Veggie Burgers for the Grill
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Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Passive Time 45 minutes
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patties
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Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Passive Time 45 minutes
Servings
patties
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Recipe Notes

Nutrition Information (per serving, without a bun):  110 calories; 0 grams fat; 0 grams saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 210 mg sodium; 20 grams carbohydrates; 5 grams dietary fiber; 6 grams protein (values are approximate).

Thai Style Vegetable Salad

Thai Style Vegetable Salad
Sometimes you just want a light salad that is easy to make and goes well with something from the grill. When the heat is on, this Thai Style Vegetable Salad is a refreshing option. It is very versatile and easy to make. Add it to your recipe box for when you are looking for an alternative to traditional green salad, often found at summer picnics.

Thai Temple

Thai style vegetable salad inspired by Thai Cuisine

Thai methods of cooking inspired me to create this salad. The cuisine in Thailand is often colorful and aromatic. It also features fresh vegetables and herbs that blend together to create a balanced and flavorful dish. This salad is bright and full of color, combining fresh carrots, tomatoes, and green vegetables. It is also a delicious, yet, mild take on Thai food.  I incorporate cilantro, lime juice, scallions, and black pepper which add an array of flavors to this recipe. All of these fresh and colorful ingredients combine into a refreshing and crunchy salad. A perfect recipe for a light lunch or side dish.

Substitute vegetables that are in season

Salads are a healthy choice that can be made with an array of ingredients. You can try combining different vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, grains or legumes. A salad is an excellent way to create a healthy dish that suits your specific tastes. If you don’t have access to some of the ingredients (e.g. when asparagus is out of season), you can substitute other vegetables that are available at that time. For instance, broccoli, cauliflower, red or green bell peppers can make excellent substitutions. They might also align more closely with your particular tastes.

What should I pair this dish with?

If you are looking to use this Thai Style Vegetable Salad as a side dish, there are two recipes I recommend. This salad pairs well with my recipe for Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce which is a delicious grilled option that complements the flavors of this salad. Or if you want an overall light and healthy meal, try my recipe for Thai Turkey Lettuce Wraps.

 

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Thai Style Vegetable Salad
Thai Style Vegetable Salad
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Cuisine Thai
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
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Cuisine Thai
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings
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Thai Style Vegetable Salad
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Recipe Notes

Nutrition information per serving: 25  calories;  0 grams fat; 0 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat;  0 mg cholesterol;  150 mg sodium; 6 grams carbohydrate; 2 grams dietary fiber; 1 gram protein (values are approximate).

Summer Green Beans and Portabello Mushroom Salad with Orange Balsamic Dressing

green beans and portabello mushroom saladAs summer takes hold and the warm evenings start to outnumber the cool ones, it’s nice to sit on the patio and enjoy a leisurely meal with friends and family. Dinners become less fussy at our house and tend towards lightly grilled meats or seafood and lots of different salads. This Summer Salad with Green Beans and Portabello Mushrooms with an Orange Balsamic Dressing is one to try if are looking for something a little different.

There are many different ways to make a salad

What I love about salads is that there are so many different ways to make them. It all just depends on what type of ingredients you want to use. Salads can also be salty or sweet depending on whether you want to incorporate more fruit or more vegetables. In addition to this salad, you might want to try my recipes for  tabbouleh and beet and citrus salad. They make a perfect light summer meal or side dish.

Green Beans and Portobello Mushroom Salad

This salad recipe has a unique yet simple combination of ingredients. It combines green beans, portobello mushrooms, oranges, and marcona almonds. If you are looking to add some plant-based protein to your salads then nuts and seeds are a good option. In this recipe, I use marcona almonds which have 6 grams of protein per ounce. They are grown almost exclusively in Spain and tend to have a softer more buttery flavor than regular almonds. The mushrooms serve to soak up the tangy citrus flavors of the orange while the green beans and marcona almonds add the crunchy texture I love in salad to create a salty, sweet and delicious dish.  Although you might think this is a unusual pairing of ingredients for a salad, it is a great way to add variety into your diet.

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Summer Green Bean and Portabello Mushroom Salad with Orange Balsamic Dressing
Greenbean Portabello Mushroom Salad
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Cuisine Vegetarian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 5 minutes
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Cuisine Vegetarian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 5 minutes
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Greenbean Portabello Mushroom Salad
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Instructions
  1. Wash green beans and cook them in boiling water for approximately 5 minutes until soft.  
  2. Place the green beans in an ice bath to stop the cooking process and cool them (it will help them retain a bright green color).  Set aside.
  3. Lightly wash and slice portobello mushrooms into 1/4" strips.
  4. Spray frying pan with canola oil and saute mushrooms briefly until soft.
  5. Combine the orange infused olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper to create the dressing.
  6. Toss green beans, mushrooms and marcona almonds gently with dressing.
  7. Top with orange pieces. Serve at once.
Recipe Notes

Nutrition Information per serving: 162 calories; 10 grams fat; 1 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat; 0 mg cholesterol; 199 mg sodium; 16 grams carbohydrate; 6 grams dietary fiber; 5 grams protein (values are approximate).

Breakfast? Whole Wheat Crepes with Fresh Berries

 crepe with berries

I don’t know about you, but there are some mornings when you want something a little different for breakfast such as whole wheat crepes with fresh berries. This is something easy to make, but nutritious. It’s something special, but does not involve cooked eggs, cold cereal, yogurt, oatmeal or muffins.  Not that I don’t enjoy all of those foods, but sometimes you want something more.  These crepes are a healthier version than traditional crepes, and they are fun to eat as you imagine yourself in a sidewalk cafe on the banks of the Seine in Paris.

If you are a little unconventional or a confirmed vegetarian or vegan, you might go with a vegetable soup or salad for breakfast. For example, a traditional breakfast in Japan includes steamed rice, miso soup, grilled fish, vegetables and Japanese pickles. It takes a little getting used to, but a Japanese breakfast packs a lot of nutritious food into a low sugar start to your day.

If a Japanese style breakfast is not for you, and you are seeking a more conventional choice,  think about making these homemade whole wheat crepes.

Whole Wheat Crepes are Nutritious and Easy to Make

I understand that making crepes from scratch may not be one of those things you currently do. However, if you’ll stick with me for a moment you’ll see just how easy they are to make. They also freeze well, and can be quickly reheated for breakfast on another day. Since they are made with whole wheat flour, two crepes provide 8 grams of protein. I made them using egg whites to reduce the amount of cholesterol and make them more “heart friendly.”

Add cottage cheese for Protein

To boost the protein, try adding a tablespoon of nonfat cottage cheese or lowfat ricotta as a filling in each of your finished crepes.  This brings the protein up to 11 g per two crepe serving. Adding a 4 oz. glass of nonfat milk and a tablespoon of walnuts will provide another 6 g of protein. This will bring the total protein for the dish up to 17 g.

The importance of protein

Why is protein important? It helps build cells, tissues and muscles throughout your body and helps your immune system.  Protein helps keep your bones healthy as shown in many research-based studies (along with calcium and vitamin D).  However, it’s important to not overdo it with protein.

 The recommended daily amount for protein is 46g for females age 14 to 51+, 52g for males age 14 to 18, and 56g for males age 19 to 51+ (US Dietary Guidelines, 2015).  If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, have certain medical conditions or are very active, your protein need may vary from these recommendations.  If you have a question about how much protein makes sense for you, consult a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist for help.

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Whole Wheat Crepes with Fresh Berries for Breakfast
Whole Wheat Crepes with Fresh Berries
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Course Breakfast
Cuisine French
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
6-8" crepes
Ingredients
Course Breakfast
Cuisine French
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
6-8" crepes
Ingredients
Whole Wheat Crepes with Fresh Berries
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Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients in food processor and mix well.  
  2. Spray 8" skillet or crepe pan with canola oil and preheat on stove.
  3. Using a  1 to 1-1/2 ounce scoop or measuring spoon to drop batter into pan and allow it to spread to fill the pan and cook.
  4. After 2-3 minutes, flip gently to cook the other side.
  5. Remove from pan and hold crepes in gently warm oven until ready to serve.
  6. Serve with fresh berries or your favorite fruit. You can also use maple syrup or other condiments as desired.
  7. To freeze: Allow finished crepes to cool completely. Place in stack separated by squares of parchment paper. Place entire stack in freezer bag, remove as much air as possible, label and freeze.
  8. To use a frozen crepe, remove from freezer, place on microwave safe dish and microwave on high for 15-20 seconds.
Recipe Notes

Nutrition information per serving (2 plain crepes):  170 calories; 8 grams fat; 1.5 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat; 115 mg cholesterol;  260 mg sodium;  17 grams carbohydrate;  2 gram dietary fiber;  8 grams protein (values are approximate).

Corn and Potato Chowder

I don’t know about you, but when a rainy day comes along and I sit down corn chowder to a meal, I often just want to have a nice hot bowl of soup. What better way to drive away the gloomy damp of the outside than to warm up on the inside? This corn and potato chowder recipe is a perfect way to brighten up a rainy day and it makes a great dish to cook for an easy supper or weekend lunch.

All About Chowder

Chowders are generally milk or cream based soups. They tend to be thick and filled with chunky vegetables making them hearty and filling. Chowders are versatile and can be made with a variety of meats or vegetables. They often contain seafood, such as the famous New England Clam Chowder. Chowder made using corn and potatoes is also a popular variation.  The great thing about a chowder, like many soups, is that you can adapt it by adding your favorite ingredients, vegetables, fish or chicken to make it your own.

A Healthier Variation

This recipe was adapted from a recipe for corn chowder from my well-loved, and cover-worn, Fannie Farmer Cookbook.  The Fannie Farmer version uses salt pork and butter.  In my version, I use a few slices of bacon instead of salt pork, skip the butter, and add some seasonings including a clove of fresh garlic. If you want to go even further towards reducing the calories and fat, you can substitute nonfat or 1 % milk and add a little potato starch as a thickener to improve the texture.  The end result is a little lower in calories and fat than then original version. These changes make it a little healthier, and it still tastes delicious.

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Corn and Potato Chowder
Corn and Potato Chowder
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Course Soups
Cuisine American
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
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Course Soups
Cuisine American
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
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Ingredients
Corn and Potato Chowder
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Recipe Notes

Approximate nutrition information per serving: 130 calories; 4.5 grams fat; 2 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat; 10 mg cholesterol;  190 mg sodium;  19 grams carbohydrate;  2 grams dietary fiber;  6 grams protein.

A Snack For Every Day of the Year*

365 Snacks for Every Day of the YearDo you ever need a snack and just can’t decide what you want?  Sarah Koszyk, a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist based in California, can help you out. Her new book,  365 Snacks for Every Day of the Year, is packed with easy to make snacks, all of which are under 250 calories.

The first chapter covers the importance of snacking. Sarah explains that research suggests that “nutritious snacks can actually help to control weight and improve overall health.”  Contrary to the old mantra that snacking causes weight gain, snacks which are nutritionally balanced, with more fiber and adequate protein, actually can help you maintain or possibly even lose weight.

 

Benefits of snacking

Benefits of nutritious snacking include optimizing energy, reducing your sugar cravings, and helping control your hunger levels.  Sarah describes how nutritious snacking helps control a hormone we make in our body called ghrelin. Ghrelin tells your body you are hungry.  She explains more about ghrelin in the book in an easy to read and straightforward manner. You don’t need a science degree to understand it.

The book contains some classic favorites such as veggies with dip, oatmeal with fresh blueberries and fresh broccoli and hummus, along with some innovative ideas that will add to the variety in your diet.  For example, have you tried sugar snap peas with Tzatziki, dried apricots with Brazil nuts or a combination of two Peruvian powerfoods (dried pichuberries with sacha inchi seeds)?

What if you have to buy your snack at a convenience store?

For long car rides, or air travel,  where you might not be able to bring your own snacks along, she also includes a helpful chapter on snack ideas about what to buy at a convenience store.

 

*Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of Sarah’s book to review. The link in this post is a link to Amazon where you may purchase the book. I do not receive any compensation if you decide to buy Sarah’s book.

 

 

Exercise is good for your bones

It’s cold outside!  Wexercise is good for the boneshen I stepped outside this morning for my walk-run, and repeated the universal mid-life mantra of women everywhere weight bearing exercise– good for the bones, weight bearing exercise — good for the bones…”,  I suddenly realized I was cold.  For a second I thought about making a quick retreat back inside to my warm and comfortable kitchen for another cup of coffee, but in the end decided to press on…after all the mantra was still pounding in my head weight bearing exercise — good for the bones….  There was no escape.

As I Got Going, My Heart Began To Pump And My Blood Started Flowing

So I took my run-walk and found that as I got moving, my heart began to pump and my blood started flowing.  After about a mile, I wasn’t quite so cold anymore, and by now I was beginning to enjoy the sparkle of early morning sunshine on the trees.  Glad to be out at the start of a bright crisp day, I remembered why I like to exercise in the early morning on days when I’ve had enough sleep.

Exercise is also good for your heart, your mental health, reducing your risk of developing diabetes, certain cancers, stress reduction and more.

I have my  favorite running shoes which don’t make me go any faster, but which feel comfortable and I can wear them for a long time. If it’s a chilly day, a good hat and gloves can help keep you warm, and lightweight long underwear helps provide another layer to keep you warm.