UPDATED – Baked Alaska – An elegant dessert for a celebration

New Year’s eve is coming soon and to celebrate the day, I thought it would be fun to make something special like Baked Alaska. This is a family favorite that I have been eating since childhood and making for almost 30 years.

Who invented Baked Alaska?

Alaska was purchased in 1867 from Russia for $7.2 million (a little over $100 million in 2016 dollars).  To celebrate the acquisition of the new territory, Chef Charles Ranhofer at Delmonico’s steakhouse in New York City created this dessert.  (March 30 1867)

When did I first eat this amazing dessert?

One of my first memories of eating Baked Alaska was at summer camp when I must have been about 10 years old.   I still vividly remember the waitresses (counselors) parading through the mess hall with Baked Alaska for all of us to celebrate some special occasion I can no longer recall. What an introduction to this wonderful dessert!

My mother started a new tradition of making Baked Alaska at home as a special birthday treat soon after I regaled her with tales of what had happened at camp.   This was certainly a tradition I endorsed.  Back then she made it with regular meringue with unpasteurized eggs, not the Italian meringue I now use in my recipe.  We didn’t worry as much about food safety in those days.   I guess we didn’t know as much about the potential perils of eating raw unpasteurized eggs as we do today.

Start a day or two in advance so the cake and ice cream are fully frozen

To make this dish you need to start a day in advance (or more), and before you start make sure you have adequate space in your freezer for the individual desserts.  Be forewarned, once you make this one time for your friends or family, they’ll never let you off the hook again.  In fact, you’ll probably find yourself making it over and over again for birthdays, holidays and the occasional family treat.

Do I personally eat Baked Alaska?

In case you are wondering, yes, I eat Baked Alaska on special occasions, despite being a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN).   Some things in life are just too good to miss…savor every moment and I hope you always enjoy good food, good health, and good friends.

 

Happy New Year!!

Have a wonderful 2020!!

 

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Baked Alaska - An elegant dessert for a celebration
A festive dessert for nearly any celebration. To cut down on the preparation time, use slices from a commercially prepared pound cake.
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Course Dessert, Holidays
Cuisine American
Prep Time 55 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Passive Time 15 hours
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servings
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Cake Bases
Italian Meringue
Course Dessert, Holidays
Cuisine American
Prep Time 55 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Passive Time 15 hours
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Cake Bases
Italian Meringue
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Instructions
prepare cake bases
  1. check your freezer to make sure you have enough space for three trays (4 to a tray) desserts.
  2. cut 6 parchment paper squares approximately 6" x 6"
  3. In the meantime, sift the cake flour and set it aside.
  4. In a separate bowl, beat egg whites until foamy. When soft peaks begin to form, slowly add 1/2 cup confectioner’s sugar. Continue to beat until stiff peaks form.
  5. Add 1/4 of the beaten egg whites to the yolk and stir gently. Carefully fold the remaining egg whites, flour and salt into the yolks. Do not over mix.
  6. Place batter in parchment lined baking sheet and bake at 350 degrees F for 25-30 minutes until done.
  7. Set cake aside to cool. While the cake is cooling, cut a new parchment sheet into twelve 4″ squares.
  8. When the cake is completely cool, cut into 2 3/4″ rounds. Place one cake round on each parchment square.
  9. Working quickly, place one scoop of ice cream (approximately 1.5 oz. size scoop) in the center of each cake round. I often use coffee flavor, but you can use any flavor you prefer.
  10. Place tray of cake bases with ice cream in freezer for several hours to re-freeze the ice cream.
Italian Meringue
  1. Place sugar, corn syrup and water in a small pot on the stove and heat until boiling.
  2. Continue to heat. When temperature of the sugar syrup gets close to 220 degrees F (use the candy thermometer) begin beating egg whites in mixer until soft peaks are formed.
  3. Slowly add 1/2 cup of confectioner’s sugar and continue to beat for 2-3 minutes. Set aside.
  4. When temperature of sugar syrup reaches approximately 240 degrees F, pour the hot sugar syrup down the side of the bowl into the egg whites while the mixer is on high.
Recipe Notes

Nutrition Information (per serving): 189 calories; 17 grams fat; 9 grams saturated fat; 107 mg cholesterol; 173 mg sodium; 67 grams carbohydrates; 0 grams dietary fiber; 10 grams protein (values are approximate).

Ukrainian Borscht

A few weeks ago my friend Nataliia brought me some Ukrainian borscht that she had made. It was, by far, the very best borscht I’d ever eaten and I immediately asked if she would share the recipe wtih you, our readers.  It is far lighter than other versions of borscht that I’ve made in the past, and if you’ll try it, I’m sure you will love it too.

Ukrainian BorschtUkraineA few years ago my friend Nataliia brought me some Ukrainian borscht that she had made. This borscht was, by far, the very best I’d ever eaten. I immediately asked if she would share the recipe with you, our readers.  This borscht is far lighter than other versions that I’ve made in the past. If you’ll try it, I’m sure you will love it too.

Borscht is borsch, in Ukrainian

Nataliia also told me that in the Ukrainian language, this dish is called borsch, without the “t”.  Since this post is written in English,  we will stick with the name “borscht”. However, I wanted to recognize the traditional spelling for any Ukrainian readers out there.

 You can make this borscht with or without meat…

Nataliia told me that this recipe is flexible and can be made with or without meat. You can also use other types of meat such as chicken or beef if you prefer. A versatile recipe is great if you are following a plant-based diet. It is also a good option if those dining have different dietary needs. In this case, I made it using pork which was the way she had made it for me. However, she assures me that it is also delicious vegetarian style. To make this borscht vegetarian, she recommended adding white beans in place of the pork. Legumes like white beans are an excellent way to add protein to a dish if you are following a plant-based diet.

A low calorie delicious choice….

This borscht is a low calorie recipe, just 120 calories per serving, yet it is still filling and delicious. It also provides beta-carotene from the beets which contain a healthy serving of this antioxidant in addition to vitamin A. If you’d like to read more about these nutrients, take a look at this fact sheet prepared by the National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements. If you do not have some of the ingredients on hand stop by the Shop to stock your pantry.

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Ukrainian Borscht
Ukrainian Borscht
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Course Soups
Cuisine Ukrainian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
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Course Soups
Cuisine Ukrainian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Ukrainian Borscht
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Instructions
  1. Chop potatoes into ½” cubes. Place in large pot on top of the stove, add water to cover the potatoes and start to cook on high.
  2. Add the salt, pork cubes (with bones), and whole beets and continue to cook on high for approximately 25 – 30 minutes.
  3. Skim the foam that accumulates on top of the water and place in a grease can to throw away
  4. In the meantime, shred the carrots and onion using a grater and set aside.
  5. Remove the beets from the water and shred using a grater.
  6. Place a large skillet on top of the stove, spray with canola or grapeseed oil, and saute the shredded onion, carrots and beets for approximately 20 minutes until soft.
  7. Add the sautéed vegetables to the large pot with the potatoes, pork and water.
  8. Add sliced cabbage and mix gently.
  9. Add tomato paste and lemon juice.
  10. Adjust the seasonings, if necessary.
  11. Continue to cook until the cabbage is cooked.
  12. Garnish each serving with dill.  If desired, add a dollop of nonfat Greek yogurt to each serving.
Recipe Notes

Nutrition Information (per serving): 120 calories; 2 grams fat; 0.5 grams saturated fat; 30 mg cholesterol; 150 mg sodium; 13 grams carbohydrates; 2 grams dietary fiber; 12 grams protein (values are approximate).

TURKEY FOR TWO

Turkey for Two

Cooking Thanksgiving dinner can be a challenge when you are cooking for two, or even for one.  I hope that you have a large and wonderful holiday planned with lots of happy animated guests.

If this year it’s just you, or you and a friend, here’s a way to have a great meal without too much work. It will give you time to enjoy a walk outside in the beautiful fall weather.

 

A brief history of the holiday

Abe Lincoln played a role in establishing Thanksgiving as a National HolidayThanksgiving has evolved over the years to how it is presented today.

The holiday was first celebrated around 1621 in the Plymouth Plantation in Massachusetts. It it was a celebration of thanks for a bountiful harvest that was gradually adopted across the US.

President Abraham Lincoln is credited with giving the Holiday a boost in 1863. He  declared that there would be a celebration of the victory at Gettysburg on August 6; and a second celebration to gather family and friends and give thanks for the good harvest on the last Thursday in November. Congress passed a law in 1941 to secure the fourth Thursday each year as a National Holiday.

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TURKEY FOR TWO
When Thanksgiving comes around and it's just you, or you and a friend. Here's a way to plan a nice dinner without too many leftovers that are hard to deal with.
Turkey for Two
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Cuisine American
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 1 1/2 hours
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Cuisine American
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 1 1/2 hours
Servings
people
Ingredients
Turkey for Two
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Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees (325 degrees if using a convection oven).
  2. Mix onion, garlic, spices and lemon juice in a small bowl. Place turkey breast on a baking sheet and cover with spice mixture.
  3. Cover loosely with aluminum foil. Roast in the oven for 1 to 1-1/2 hours, removing foil for last 20-25 minutes so that turkey breast will brown. Cooking time will vary based on the size and shape of the turkey breast, and whether it is boneless or not.
  4. Turkey must be cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 165 degrees (use a meat thermometer).
  5. Once you remove it from the oven, allow it to rest for 10-15 minutes loosely covered with foil. Some carry over cooking may occur. Carve and enjoy.
  6. For an easy alternative to stuffing, try Quinoa with Mushrooms and Dried Cranberries.
Recipe Notes

*If you can't find this cut, you may substitute a small regular turkey breast. Cooking time will be longer.

Nutrition information per serving:    270 calories; 3 grams fat;  1 gram saturated fat; 120 mg cholesterol; 200 mg sodium; 5 grams carbohydrate;  1 gram dietary fiber;  48 grams protein (values are approximate)

(Source: https://www.plimoth.org/learn/just-kids/homework-help/thanksgiving/thanksgiving-history).

Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce

Chicken Satay with Peanut SauceOne of my go-to favorite dishes is Chicken Satay with peanut sauce. Chicken Satay is originally from Indonesia, but it has been adopted into many other Asian cuisines.  It is very easy to make, and is always very popular whenever I serve it to family or friends.

Indonesia is the world’s largest island country. It is made up of more than 17,000 islands and has a population of 238 million. According to a census completed in 2000, 88% of the population is muslim (US Department of State).

The food is colorful and diverse. There is also some variation by regions.  Chicken Satay is always well received when I serve it to my friends and family. Nasi Goreng, Gado Gado, Corn Patties and Beef Rendang, are some of my other Indonesian favorites.

Use Light Coconut Milk for an improved nutritional profile

Since coconut milk has a high fat and high saturated fat content, I use light coconut milk to improve the nutritional profile of this dish.  For those of you who like numbers —  1 cup of regular coconut milk has about 420 calories, 52 grams of fat and 36 grams of saturated fat. However,  1 cup of light coconut milk has about 150 calories, 13.5 grams of fat and 12 grams of saturated fat. If you are following a heart healthy diet, it’s important to limit the daily intake of saturated fats as well as transfats. I made the switch to the light coconut milk in order to make this dish more heart friendly. It also gives it a better nutritional profile, overall.

Chicken Satay makes a fun weekly meal or party hors d’oeuvres

Chicken Satay is a fun recipe to add to your weekly meal plan. It makes a colorful and healthy dish that is perfect for dinner in the warmer months when paired with a light salad. This dish goes especially well with  Southeast Asian Cucumber Salad or Thai Style Vegetable Salad. I switch back and forth between these side salads from time to time. I like options when it comes to cooking so I can keep meals exciting and diverse. Add  a small portion of brown rice and you are set for a delicious meal.

Chicken Satay also makes a great appetizer when you are having a crowd over for a party or gathering. In this case,  I like to use smaller skewers and less chicken per skewer.  Add a small slice of red or green pepper or a cherry tomato to make them more festive.  Using smaller skewers and less chicken per skewer makes them slightly lighter fare which makes them more of an hors d’oeuvre than a main course.

 

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CHICKEN SATAY WITH PEANUT SAUCE
Chicken Satay
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Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 15-20 minutes
Passive Time 1-2 hours
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Chicken
Peanut Sauce Ingredients
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 15-20 minutes
Passive Time 1-2 hours
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Chicken
Peanut Sauce Ingredients
Chicken Satay
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Recipe Notes

Nutrition information per serving (2 skewers with sauce):  430 calories; 24 grams fat; 5 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat; 105 mg cholesterol; 425 mg sodium; 10 grams carbohydrate; 2 grams dietary fiber; 41 grams protein.

Japanese-Style Cabbage Slaw

Japanese-style cabbage slawCabbage often gets a bad rap as a vegetable to avoid. It causes gastrointestinal distress in some people and has a strong odor when cooked. Cooked cabbage conjures up thoughts of long cold dark winter nights in a lonely, snowy mountain cabin.   I happen to like cabbage and would like you to consider making it a part of your healthy diet.  This Japanese-style cabbage slaw is packed with nutrients, fiber and vitamins C, E and K.

Japanese-Style Cabbage Slaw

One of my favorite ways to eat cabbage is this recipe for Japanese-style Cabbage Slaw.  This non-traditional salad is made without mayonnaise. As a result, the fat content is lower. It contains rice vinegar, instead,  so it keeps well in the refrigerator. It is a nice addition for an outdoor barbecue, and is a safer choice to have out on a buffet than traditional coleslaw when the temperature is soaring. Want an alternative to a traditional salad for lunch? This slaw is a good choice that will keep fresh longer since it does not contain mayonnaise.

Red Cabbage for Vitamin C

Red and green cabbage are found in various Asian cuisines. In this recipe I opted to use red cabbage instead of  green to increase the amount of Vitamin C you get in each serving.  One cup of green cabbage provides around 32 mg of Vitamin C.  One cup of red cabbage provides 50 mg of Vitamin C.  The recommended daily value for vitamin C is 75 mg for women and 90 mg for men over the age of 19.  The higher vitamin C content of red cabbage makes it a better choice than green cabbage if you are trying to increase your vitamin C intake.

Why do we need Vitamin C in our diet?

Vitamin C is a water-soluble nutrient that acts as an antioxidant, which helps prevent damage to cells caused by free radicals. Vitamin C makes collagen for the body to heal wounds.  It helps the immune system, and improves iron absorption from plant based foods.

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Japanese-Style Cabbage Slaw
Japanese-Style Cabbage Slaw
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Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Passive Time 1 hours
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Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Passive Time 1 hours
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Japanese-Style Cabbage Slaw
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Instructions
  1. Wash and chop all vegetables.
  2. Combine with all ingredients except sesame seeds in a large non-reactive bowl.
  3. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour or more, turning occasionally to distribute dressing evenly throughout the slaw. 
  4. Drain and serve. Top with toasted sesame seeds if desired.
Recipe Notes

Nutrition information per serving: 80 calories; 3.5 grams fat; 0.5 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat; 0 mg cholesterol;  410 mg sodium;  12 grams carbohydrate;  2 grams dietary fiber;  1 gram protein (values are approximate).

 

References:

Raw Red Cabbage by USDA Food Composition Database

Raw Cabbage by USDA Food Composition Database

Daily Nutritional Goals for Age-Sex Groups Based on Dietary Reference Intakes and Dietary Guidelines Recommendations

Do you eat artichokes?

artichokes and cherries at aix market
Farmer’s market in Aix-en-Provence

Artichokes are everywhere in the grocery store this time of year and they make a delicious treat for dinner.  I  grew up eating artichokes every once in a while. Back then we ate them with a side of butter sauce and a little extra salt.  I learned from a young age how to navigate my way around the “choke” which hides in the middle of the vegetable, lying in wait for an unsuspecting diner.

Artichokes in Paris

When I was a little older, I was once served an artichoke in Paris. I was there for a study abroad semester during my university days.  I’ll never forget how surprised my French host family was  when they saw that I knew how to eat an artichoke. They had apparently never met an American who had been raised in the ways of this wily vegetable.

Artie the Artichoke

Fighting artichoke
Artie the Fighting Artichoke.

I am also a fan of the Fighting Artichokes who hail from the Scottsdale Arizona Community College athletic department.  Despite having  no direct tie to that college, I love their mascot, Artie the Artichoke. I first learned about Artie  on a trip to Arizona a few years back.  According to several news blogs, Artie was selected by the students as the school’s mascot back in the 1970s.

Cooking and Eating Artichokes

Moving on to food and nutrition – here’s a bit about cooking and eating artichokes.  Artichokes are low in calories (about 90 calories for an entire large artichoke) and contain potassium and vitamin C along with a good amount of dietary fiber (over 8 g in a large artichoke).  Where the extra calories can sneak in, is in the sauce that is typically served alongside the artichoke for dipping.  I serve a simple balsamic vinaigrette as the dipping sauce; if you serve melted butter, hollandaise or mayonnaise instead, you will significantly add to the calories you gain from this dish.

Be sure to stop by the shop to stock up on supplies.

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Do you eat artichokes?
Do you eat artichokes
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Course Appetizers, Snacks
Cuisine French
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings
Course Appetizers, Snacks
Cuisine French
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings
Do you eat artichokes
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Recipe Notes

*If you are planning a more formal presentation of the artichokes, for example if you are serving them to guests, pull off the first layer of the tough outer leaves and/or cut the thorny tips off the leaves before cooking and brush with a little lemon juice to prevent discoloration. When I am serving artichokes at home, I usually don’t bother with this step.

Nutrition information per artichoke:  90 calories; 5 grams fat; 1 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat; 0 mg cholesterol;  102 mg sodium;  20 grams carbohydrate;  10 grams dietary fiber;  5 grams protein (values are approximate).

 

Red White and Blue Berry Pavlova

Happy 4th of July!  I hope you have a wonderful holiday weekend and can get some time off from your busy life to get together with family and friends.  To help you celebrate, here’s a tried and true dessert, Red White and Blue Berry Pavlova.

What is a Pavlova?

A pavlova is a meringue based dessert filled with sweetened whip cream and topped with berries or fruit.  Pavlova’s are often associated with either Australia or New Zealand.  They date back to the 1920s or 30s.  They are thought to have been named in honor of a Russian ballerina from around the turn of the century – Anna Pavlova.

 

Berry Pavlova is a Fun and Special Dessert

This recipe makes a great addition to the menu for a 4th of July gathering or other summer celebrations.  The meringues and whip cream filling create a background of white and the combination of strawberries, raspberries and blueberries combine into a red white and blue color scheme perfect for a festive holiday. This dessert is a fun and special way to celebrate Independence Day.

Cooking Tip for Making Meringues

Make sure the temperature in your kitchen is cool if you are making meringues.  If it is too hot, the meringues will be difficult to make and may end up sticky, instead of dry and light. Stop by the shop if you want to purchase the ramekins or other ingredients to make this recipe.

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Red White and Blue Berry Pavlova
Red White and Blue Berry Pavlova
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Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 1 1/4 hours
Servings
Pavlovas
Ingredients
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 1 1/4 hours
Servings
Pavlovas
Ingredients
Red White and Blue Berry Pavlova
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Recipe Notes

Nutrition Information per serving (1 pavlova): 140 calories; 8 grams fat; 5 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat; 30 mg cholesterol;  20 mg sodium;   17 grams carbohydrate;  2 grams dietary fiber;  2 grams protein (values are approximate).

Harvest Farro Salad with Lemon Dressing

 

Whole grains are an important part of a healthy diet and research shows that most Americans do not get eat anywhere close to the recommended amount.  One grain that many people have traditionally overlooked is farro. Farro is a type of wheat and can be used in many different ways including salads, soups and side dishes.

The Fertile Crescent
The Fertile Crescent (www.ancient.eu/image/5435/)

There are three types of farro, einkorn, emmer and spelt. They can be purchased as whole grains (which must be soaked before cooking), pearled (cooks the quickest but can be gummy as all the bran is removed) or semi-pearled (less gummy than pearled since some of the bran is left intact).  According to NPR, it is thought to have originated in the fertile crescent and it has been found in tombs of Egyptian kings.

Catherine Zymaris, RD, originally wrote this post a few years ago as a Dietetic Intern at Rutgers School of Health Related Professions.  She is now a clinical Dietitian at New York Presbyterian Hospital.

This is her wonderful recipe for Harvest Farro Salad that is a whole grain salad. It is delicious, nutritious and easy to make.  It stores well in the refrigerator and makes a great addition for weekday lunches.

PLEASE NOTE:  Farro is NOT a gluten-free grain. It is a type of wheat and should not be eaten if you have celiac disease, gluten allergy or other gluten sensitivity, etc.

Harvest Farro Salad with Lemon Dressing

by Catherine Zymaris, RD

The ancient grain of farro

The past few years has seen a rise in the popularity of ancient grains, like quinoa, amaranth, freekah, and farro. These grains are appearing on restaurant menus and on grocery store shelves. Ancient grains are featured prominently in blogs, social media, and on television. The ancient grain that I love the most is farro. It is a delicious, nutty grain that is a great source of fiber (more than any ancient grain), protein, vitamin B3, zinc, magnesium, and iron. A half-cup of cooked farro has double the protein of the same amount of brown rice!

What type of farro is best?

The only pitfall to farro is the type to buy; this grain comes either as unpearled, semi-pearled, or pearled. Unpearled has the bran fully intact on the grain, which requires an overnight soak and a long cooking time. Pearled (the bran is completely removed) has the shortest cooking time but leaves the grains gummy and unappealing. For the best results in both texture and cooking time, try semi-pearled – the bran is partially intact, providing a good amount of fiber but a 20-30-minute cooking time.

What are other ways to use farro?

Use farro in a variety of ways. It can be a replacement for rice in risotto or pasta for soup. My  favorite way to use semi-pearled farro is as a base of a cold salad that is perfect as a main vegetarian course or as an easy side dish. This Harvest Farro Salad with Lemon Dressing is a nod to the flavors of the season and highlights farro’s hearty chew. I hope you enjoy!

Check out the shop to purchase your farro online.

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HARVEST FARRO SALAD WITH LEMON DRESSING
Farro can be used in a variety of ways, from a replacement for rice in risotto or pasta for soup, but my favorite way to use semi-pearled farro is as a base of a cold salad that is perfect as a main vegetarian course or as an easy side dish. This Harvest Farro Salad with Lemon Dressing is a nod to the flavors of the season and highlights farro’s hearty chew. I hope you enjoy!
Harvest Farro Salad
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Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
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Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
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Harvest Farro Salad
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Recipe Notes

Nutrition Information (per serving): 300 calories; 15 grams fat; 2 grams saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 410 mg sodium; 36 grams carbohydrates; 5 grams dietary fiber; 7 grams protein (values are approximate).

Harissa Tuna Salad

harissa tunaSalads are a great choice for a quick light meal. You can often make them in advance (don’t put any dressing on or wet ingredients like tuna until you are ready to serve) They are also packed full of nutrients to help you stay on track with your healthy eating goals. By using harissa spice in this salad, you get an interesting non-traditional tuna salad that contains no mayonnaise or celery as is common in most American delis.  This version provides approximately 15 g of protein, 2 g of fat and no saturated fat.

What is Harissa?

Harissa spice is made from various sorts of chili peppers. It can include garlic, cumin, coriander or other spices and is traditionally used in North African cuisine. It also has a bit of a kick, so if you don’t like spicy food, this recipe may not be for you (or use less spice to tone it down). You can buy harissa at specialty spice shops or on-line, or you can make your own.  Different brands of harissa will have a different mix of ingredients, so you might have to experiment a bit to find the flavor profile you enjoy.

A Light Lunch or Healthy Snack

In this recipe I’ve combined tuna with garbanzos, parsley, onion and cherry tomatoes, and seasoned it with harissa spice, lemon juice, ground pepper and a touch of salt. I often serve this Harissa tuna salad with whole grain crackers and the combination makes a healthy snack. In addition to crackers, you can also add fresh fruit of your choice to create a nutritious light lunch.

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Harissa Tuna Salad
Harissa Tuna Salad
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Course Salads, Snacks
Cuisine American
Prep Time 10 minutes
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Course Salads, Snacks
Cuisine American
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
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Ingredients
Harissa Tuna Salad
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Instructions
  1. Drain and rinse tuna.
  2. Drain and rinse garbanzo beans.
  3. Mix all ingredients in a small bowl. Adjust seasonings as needed.
  4. Serve over lettuce with some whole grain crackers.
  5. Add a little fresh fruit on the side and you are set for a delicious lunch.
Recipe Notes

Nutrition Information per serving (3/4 cup): 160 calories; 2 grams fat; 0 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat; 15 mg cholesterol; 340 mg sodium; 21 grams carbohydrate; 5 grams dietary fiber; 15 grams protein (values are approximate).

Kohlrabi Tzatziki: A Nutritious and Delicious Twist

kohlrabi tatziki

Kohlrabi is in season in late spring and early summer, and is another great choice from the cruciferous family of vegetables. In this recipe we’ve used the traditional tzatziki concept, but added a twist by using kohlrabi in place of the usual cucumber.

Why do we love cruciferous vegetables?  They contain glucosinolates which may have anti-cancer properties and in some research studies have been shown to enhance certain detoxifying enzymes and tumor suppressor gene function.

What is a cruciferous vegetable?

There are over 350 foods that are members of the cruciferous family including broccoli, cabbage, kale, watercress, arugula, wasabi and kohlrabi.  Different members of the cruciferous family have different nutritional properties, which is why it is a good idea to eat a wide variety of choices throughout your week.

What about vitamins and fiber in kohlrabi?

A cup of raw kohlrabi contains around 84 mg of vitamin C.  The recommended daily allowance of vitamin C for adults over age 19 is 90 mg/day for men and 75 mg/day for women. A cup of kohlrabi also has nearly 5 g of fiber, which helps with digestive health and can help you feel full longer.

What’s Tzatziki?

Tzatiziki is a sauce or dip found in Greek and Turkish cuisine. It is also common in Indian cuisine where it is called raita; in Turkey it is called cacik. All of these versions are traditionally made with strained yogurt, cucumbers and garlic.  It is delicious when served with vegetables or whole grain pita bread; it can also be used as a sauce for grilled meats.  In this recipe, I’ve used kohlrabi in place of the traditional cucumber to add a nutritious and delicious twist.

Add this dish to your recipe collection today; it’s quick, it’s easy, and your family and friends are sure to love it!

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KOHLRABI TZATZIKI
Kohlrabi Tzatziki
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Course Appetizers
Cuisine Greek, Turkish
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
cup
Ingredients
Course Appetizers
Cuisine Greek, Turkish
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
cup
Ingredients
Kohlrabi Tzatziki
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Recipe Notes

Nutrition Information (per cup): 100 calories; 0.5 grams fat; 0 grams saturated fat; 5 mg cholesterol; 1220 mg sodium; 11 grams carbohydrates; 3 grams dietary fiber; 13 grams protein (values are approximate).