Buckwheat Noodles with Parsley Walnut Pesto

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Buckwheat Noodles with Parsley Walnut PestoParsley walnut pesto over buckwheat noodles makes a delicious lunch or dinner that can be eaten hot or cold, and involves minimal preparation.

In the summer growing season, you might have extra parsley in the garden, and this makes a great way to use it as an alternative to tabbouleh.  In the winter or early spring (or if you are not a gardener), you can buy wonderful Italian parsley most of the year. The main thing is you need to use fresh parsley for this recipe; dried parsley will not provide the flavor or texture to make the pesto correctly.

What is buckwheat? Is it some sort of wheat?

Buckwheat is not from the wheat family. In fact, it is not actually related to wheat at all. It is a pseudo-cereal grain which means   its seeds can be ground into flour and otherwise used as cereals.  On a nutritional level, Buckwheat has a high protein content. It is a good source of manganese.  Manganese is a trace mineral (i.e. you don’t need a lot of it), which helps the body form connective tissue, bones, blood clotting factors and sex hormones. Buckwheat  also provides copper, magnesium, fiber and potassium.

The fiber can help slow down the absorption of glucose which can be beneficial for diabetics or those trying to maintain balanced blood sugar levels. Used in Asian and East European cuisine for over 8,000 years, Buckwheat has become a widely consumed grain and can be found in a wide variety of recipes.

Buckwheat noodles and sodium

From a healthy eating perspective, this recipe is high in sodium if made with “regular” buckwheat noodles.  The recommended sodium intake for people under age 51 is 2,300 mg/day; for age 51 and older, it is 1,500 mg/day.  If this dish is made with “regular” buckwheat noodles, a single serving contains 650 mg of sodium (nearly 30% of your recommended daily amount if you are under age 51; over 40% of your recommended daily amount if you are age 51 or older).

Use low sodium buckwheat noodles

If you use a very low sodium buckwheat noodle (5 mg per serving) and don’t add any extra salt, the total sodium content for this dish drops to 35 mg per serving.  If you need more flavor, try adding extra garlic, pepper or lemon juice instead of extra salt or soy sauce.

 

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Barbara Spalding RDN Culinary Dietitian

Hi, I am

Barbara Spalding MS, RDN, Culinary Dietitian

As a dietitian and world traveler, I love bold flavors — in food and in life. 14 years ago, I fell down the rabbit hole into Breast Cancer Wonderland. Since then, I’ve learned to cook differently while savoring the pleasures of food and companionship. I’ve built a resilient new life and a bold new kitchen. Let me show you the flavors of the world.
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Print Recipe
Buckwheat Noodles with Parsley Walnut Pesto
buckwheat noodles with parsley walnut pesto
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
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Rate this recipe!
Course
Course Main Dish
Cuisine
Cuisine Fusion
Prep Time
15 minutes
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time
5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings
servings
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Parsley Walnut Pesto
Buckwheat Noodles with Parsley Walnut Pesto
Course
Course Main Dish
Cuisine
Cuisine Fusion
Prep Time
15 minutes
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time
5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings
servings
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Parsley Walnut Pesto
Buckwheat Noodles with Parsley Walnut Pesto
buckwheat noodles with parsley walnut pesto
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Instructions
Parsley Walnut Pesto
  1. Blend all the pesto ingredients in a food processor to form a paste. Adjust seasonings as needed. Set aside.
    parsley walnut pesto
Buckwheat Noodles with Parsley Walnut Pesto
  1. Cook buckwheat noodles in boiling water for 3-5 minutes until soft.
  2. Drain and rinse thoroughly.
  3. Combine noodles with Parsley Walnut Pesto, the black beans and the peas.  
  4. Place in serving dish, top with walnuts and enjoy!
    buckwheat noodles with parsley walnut pesto
Recipe Notes

*Although buckwheat is often described as a gluten-free food, many varieties of buckwheat noodles contain wheat flour and are not gluten-free. Please read all food labels carefully.

Nutrition information per serving of Buckwheat Noodles with Parsley Walnut Pesto:  280 calories; 7 grams fat; 0.5 grams saturated fat; 0 grams transfat; 0 mg cholesterol;  650 mg sodium;  41 grams carbohydrate;  4 grams dietary fiber;  11 grams protein (values are approximate)

1 Comment

  1. Bernadette Perrone on February 20, 2018 at 12:56 pm

    This looks yummy..I will be sure to surprise my husband with this new meal..

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