A cup of ginger tea

A cup of ginger teaBusy day? Sometimes it helps to pause and have a cup of tea.  Feeling under the weather due to the flu or other illness? Ginger tea is a soothing “comfort” drink that goes down easily and can make you feel better.

This post is dedicated to Indian style ginger tea.  My friend Pam tells me that when you make a social call in India, tea is always offered to welcome you as a guest.  It is also a nice way to reset your afternoon when you need a break and don’t want to add a lot of extra calories or sugar from a commercially prepared hot beverage and is usually served with a small snack. If you want something sweet with your tea, try my Cinnamon Almond Biscotti.  If you are avoiding caffeine, you can substitute decaffeinated black tea in the recipe.

 

What’s the difference between green, black and white teas?

A couple of years ago I had the opportunity to visit one of the world’s largest tea plantations near Munnar, India and learned a lot about the cultivation of this essential plant.   I found out that green tea, black tea and white tea all come from the same bush – Camellia Sinensis – but have different levels of processing which gives the teas their distinct characteristics.  Green tea is lightly steamed, but not oxidized.  Black tea is oxidized using heat and moisture to develop the leaves.  White tea is minimally processed.

The amount of caffeine varies among the different varieties but is generally similar, regardless of whether it is black, green or white tea. Both black and green tea have been studied for their potential impact on mental alertness, heart disease, and certain types of cancers.  Research is ongoing, and like much nutrition research is still in need of clarification.

About the ginger

Some research has shown that ginger can be potentially helpful with symptoms of nausea and vomiting from various causes.  Be cautious with using ginger if you take any blood clotting medications such as warfarin (Coumadin). If you are on any medications, be sure to ask your doctor for advice before starting to drink a lot of ginger tea.

We made our ginger tea with milk but no sugar.  If you want to add some sugar, that is up to you. However, in the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015 -2020 which were recently released by the USDA, the recommendation is that less than 10% of your calories per day come from added sugars.

This recipe is part of my comfort food series.

Barbara Spalding RDN Culinary Dietitian

Hi, I am

Barbara Spalding MS, RDN, Culinary Dietitian

As a dietitian and world traveler, I love bold flavors — in food and in life. 14 years ago, I fell down the rabbit hole into Breast Cancer Wonderland. Since then, I’ve learned to cook differently while savoring the pleasures of food and companionship. I’ve built a resilient new life and a bold new kitchen. Let me show you the flavors of the world.
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Print Recipe
A cup of ginger tea
Votes: 0
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Cuisine Indian
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Cuisine Indian
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Instructions
  1. Place water and ginger in a small pot on top of the stove and bring to a boil.
  2. Add the tea bags and steep for 3 minutes.
  3. Add the milk and return to a boil for approximately 1 minute.
  4. Strain into a tea cup and enjoy.
  5. Add sugar, to taste, if needed.
  6. You can also make this in the morning before you leave for work and then reheat it later in the day in a microwave safe container when you wat to enjoy a cup of tea in the afternoon.
Recipe Notes

Nutrition information per cup (without sugar):  15 calories;  0.5 grams fat; 0 grams saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol;  20 mg sodium; 2 grams carbohydrate; 0 grams dietary fiber;  1 gram protein (values are approximate).

Resources

For information regarding tea and cancer prevention, click here for a fact sheet prepared by the National Cancer Institute.

If you'd like to purchase Tetley Original tea, click here.

 

Pam Mehta and Barbara Spalding, MA, MS, RDN

Pam Mehta & Barbara Spalding, MA, MS, RDN

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